Last week we promised to keep the message alive about congressional funding to public media. More than ever many of us feel isolated, anxious and uncertain about our work and careers. Making media and the arts has always been viewed as secondary to concerns like social services, education and the like. The troubles pile on in the black community when you add police brutality, depression, poverty and powerlessness run rampant. Yet, the expression of art through music, dance, theater, and ever increasingly through all forms of media, is connected to our very survival as a people in a country where we must fight every day to live as free and equal human beings.

The issue we pose this week for discussion – and for which we’re asking your input – is this: How do we demonstrate that media concerns are just as critical to our communities’ survival as issues of health, education and the environment?

The idea of a complex black media should be viewed as part of the solutions to our communities’ problems. How do we build coalitions that place inclusion of diverse black media at the top of their agenda? 

For the next six weeks, we will be exploring these questions and proposing solutions in our newsletter. We will bring in guest writers and suggest new ways of unifying as a strong community to continue to create (and recreate) stories for survival.

By subscribing to this newsletter you’ve shown your interest in these matters. You can take it another step by sharing this newsletter far and wide, as well as your own comments and experiences. Make a post on Facebook. Tweet @BLKPublicMedia. Start a discussion on our Resources Page. Open dialogue is a key to a healthy democracy.

Many thanks for your support, and please continue to spread the word.

 

Sincerely,

Leslie Fields-Cruz
Executive Director, NBPC