Death Becomes Us, But Is It Funny?

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So in the end, is death funny? Well, we all process the aftermath of death differently, and we’re all children of cultures that have struggled with the question of how to honor the dead for eons, but the message of this wonderfully moving short is this – while we might all be strangers from the Internet to each other, we all understand the loss of death, even when we can’t explain it.

Vivre: A Young Boy’s Flight of Reality

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Produced and shot in Guadeloupe and Martinique, the film represents Caribbean storytelling at its best; however, it is set far from the usual tropical clichés and white-sand beaches picture post-cards often depict. Rather, the story unfolds in a contrasted urban and social realm in which the character travels through time.

72 Hours: A Brooklyn Love Story

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Our friends over at Reel Works Teen Filmmaking are doing some great work. They’ve been supporting emerging media makers for years and now they are taking advantage of the crowd-source funding model to essentially make a crowd-sourced feature film – ambitious and wonderful! Here is what one of the young filmmakers had to say about… Read more »

God Might Love Uganda, But He Hates You

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Someone once said there’s a thin line between love and hate. (I think it was Martin Lawrence? Right? Yeah, let’s go with that.) Roger Ross Williams paints a riveting picture of that thin line in his beautiful, lyrical documentary “God Loves Uganda” – also known as how I spent my Sunday afternoon. It’s great to… Read more »

Auntie from Barbados: Women and the Caribbean International Family

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Lisa Harewood is a socially motivated artist whose short film, “Auntie,” invites contemplation of Caribbean life, immigration, extended matriarchal families and those left behind. Her debut effort as a writer and director, Harewood’s film is the result of a last- minute decision to enter the Commonwealth Foundation’s development scheme. More than a lark, Harewood said… Read more »

A Modern Day Middle Passage

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Bodies washed ashore on white sand beaches. Immigrants’ corpses littering the shores of paradise. These are images Bahamian Filmmaker Kareem Mortimer recalls of his youth. “I had always known about this” Mortimer said in a recent interview for NBPC’s AfroPoP: The Ultimate Cultural Exchange. Mortimer said he remembers hearing, night after night, the reports as… Read more »

Top Five Maya Angelou Tributes from Public Media

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“I believe that words are things, and I live on them.” ~ Maya Angelou It is extremely difficult to narrow down the impact of a world-class artist like Maya Angelou, evident in the fact her Twitter hashtag #MayaAngelou is going strong already and will predictably break some records. (When your death is powerful enough to… Read more »

Jacquie Jones Steps Down At NBPC

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NEW YORK (May 1, 2014)—Jacquie Jones, who has served as executive director of National Black Programming Consortium (NBPC) since 2005, has stepped down. The board of directors of the 35-year- old nonprofit, which develops, produces and funds media content about the black experience for public media outlets, including television, digital radio and online, accepted her… Read more »